My talks in 2013

December '13: O'Hanlon's helden (VPRO)

Presentation given in the Artis library in Amsterdam titled 'That other theft...quinine', about the theft of quinine seeds from the Ecuadorian Andes by Richard Spruce and others. As part of the VPRO television series 'O'Hanlon's heroes', the first episode of which focused on Henry Wickham, who smuggled rubber seeds out of Brazil.

December '13: Malaria: The biting truth

Presentation during the annual meeting of the Israel Society for Parasitology, Protozoology and Tropical Diseases, 11 December, 2013, Jerusalem, Israel. In 'Malaria: The Biting Truth' I confront audiences with the gripping and harsh realities of malaria. By starting with some remarkable discoveries in the late 19th Century, I then walk through a century of successes and failures in the combat against malaria, richly augmented with video material. To end with the eye-opening reality that if we would learn better from the past, we could go much further today.

September '13: Society for Vector Ecology

Keynote address delivered during the opening of the international Society for Vector Ecology (SOVE) congress, in La Quinta, California, USA, 23 September 2013.

September '13: TEDx Maastricht

I was thrilled that I was invited to give another TEDx talk at TEDx Maastricht this year, under the theme '9 Billion and You!' about the world moving towards 2050, when there will be 9 billion people on the planet.

My talk is titled: 'Now that we don't talk anymore'. To see it, follow this link: https://www.youtube.com/­watch?v=HFGNcmdoWH4

Pictures below: Copyright Jeanine Opreij

July '13 - Albert Schweitzer Centennial conference, Libreville, Gabon

Presentation given during the Centennial conference held in Libreville, Gabon. Joint presentation with Prof. Greg Lanzaro (UC Davis) on the current status and challenges of vector control, and new paradigms under development (genetic control of disease vectors).

Presentation: http://vimeo.com/­70150153#

June '13 - Wageningen University & Research Centre

Talk during the festive start of the new languages office of WUR and Radboud University called 'in'to languages'. My talk focused on the role of english in my work, and was titled 'World englishes from a scientist's perspective.

May '13: Felix meritis, Amsterdam

Presentation and discussion forum about 'Scientivism' or 'Science activism', about the role scientists have to play in society, their engagement in activism, and the pros and cons of this engagement. With Pim Martens (Univ. of Maastricht), Raf de Bont (Univ. of Leuven/Maastricht), and Hans Harbers (Univ. of Groningen); Amsterdam, 22 May.

http://macademics.nl/­activiteiten/­22-mei-aftrap-macademics-de-wetenschapper-als-activist/­

May '13: Ig Nobel show Geneva

Presentation given at the University of Geneva as part of the Ig Nobel Show that was held there on 7 May 2013. A packed auditorium marveled at the many examples that were given by Marc Abrahams of research that 'first makes you LAUGH and then makes you THINK'. The power of these events is that they are full of humor and fun, but also stimulate scientific discussion. Always fun to be part of this, and I talked about my Ig Nobel Prize in Biology (2006) where Ruurd de Jong and myself showed that African malaria mosquitoes can be attracted to the smell of Limburger cheese, that resembles human foot odour...

Mar '13: Communicating science & The Route from Academia to Entrepreneurship

Two lectures on how best to communicate science and how to prepare for the road from academia to entrepreneurship. PE&RC weekend of final year PhD students. Wageningen University (by invitation).

Mar '13: Malaria: The biting truth

Presentation given at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. In 'Malaria: The Biting Truth' I confront audiences with the gripping and harsh realities of malaria. By starting with some remarkable discoveries in the late 19th Century, I then walk through a century of successes and failures in the combat against malaria, richly augmented with video material. To end with the eye-opening reality that if we would learn better from the past, we could go much further today.

Feb '13: If Gates gave you 10 million for mosquito research, what would you do with it?

Keynote lecture give at the 79th Annual meeting of the American Mosquito Control Association, in Atlantic City, NJ, USA. Abstract of my talk: Surely a title like this gets us thinking. What are the real priorities, how can we come up with some really novel control tools, and how do we steer the innovation process? And perhaps also: What is hindering the development of radical new approaches to mosquito control? Is our environment conducive to radical thinking and radical solutions? And if not, how do we create it? In this talk I hope to convince you of the power of lateral thinking and how this can aid the discovery of new approaches in mosquito control. Was the discovery of Limburger cheese as an attractant for African Anopheles radical? Yes. Was it radical to train a sniffer dog to detect Aedes aegypti breeding sites? Yes. Was it radical to turn our blood insecticidal by taking a magic pill? Surely yes. These ideas stemmed from relatives, a lawyer, and a veterinarian, respectively. Not from peer medical entomologists. And all proved valuable. If we want to raise the global status of mosquito control as a primary means to curb disease transmission, then we need more drastic successes. Particularly in developing countries rife with malaria or dengue. Creative solutions are there, but to find them we need to leave our comfort zone and become 'out of the box' thinkers and do-ers. Challenging? Yes. Rewarding? For sure. So what would you do with 10 million?
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